Synthesis #5

A photo I took in Broken Hill of Eduardo Nasta Luna’s sculpture–Facing the Day and the Night–forms the background for this, the fifth in my ongoing syntheses project. I flipped that photo vertically and combined it with the original to create a symmetrical inkblot effect, and then introduced a black and white photo of a mob of kangaroos that I took a few years earlier in Murramarang NP on the south coast. The result is a distant memory, appropriately photographically aged, at the foreground of memories more recent: that’s the theory behind it:)

Synthesis #5

Pink Moon: a CD Spine poem

So I was sitting in dappled sunlight this arvo peeling price labels off the latest additions to my CD collection and wondered if I could use the dapples like a highlighter pen, or maybe a pair of scissors, to lift a cutup poem out of the spines. The exercise required a lot more speed and dexterity than I had first expected, with the shapes of the dapples and their positions changing faster than I could line the words up in them. The constant movement also had a kind of randomising effect, leading me to shuffle the lines around a number of times. In the end I couldn’t get the words to pop in the light like I’d hoped to, but the poem I discovered in the process surprised me. Also, I don’t think I’ll ever be able to look at a pink moon rising from the ocean again without likening it to a prawn cracker!

 

 

Pink Moon
O’ Cracker Where Art Thou?
Places Like This
Birds Of Fire
The Magic Numbers
Deeper

 

Birdcall morning

The birdcall in the image and sound above is one that I recorded in The Grampians early this year. I don’t know what species it belongs to, and I haven’t yet figured out how to use a search engine to study a sound file and tell me what bird it is. I’m sure before too long I will be joining a birding club and socialising with people who can assist me directly in such matters.

I think the bird in this recording is with chicks, and is calling out for its partner but is getting no response. I’ve listened to this recording many times and couldn’t escape the feeling that it had been abandoned, and the final two minutes are what it sounds like when a bird is pining for its lover. Then I recalled a longtime favorite song of mine by Joe Walsh–Birdcall Morning. The crescendo and climax of this song bear a remarkable, if metaphorical, similarity. Maybe it is not so much a pining, but is simply saying, “Please come home and look after the kids for a bit. Set me free.”

Synthesis #4


This is a composite of three photos I took at Mount Tomah Botanical Gardens. I wasn’t using a tripod so each photo had a fractionally different framing, which served nicely to create something of a brushstroke effect. I also reoriented it from portrait to landscape, giving the waterfall more volume and enhancing the possibilities for pareidolia. How many human faces can you see in the wall?

Synthesis #4