Cylindrical Hexplorations

Cylindrical Hexplorations: An exploration of juxtaposition, layered transpositions of pixelated and pre-pixelated hexadecimal image data ‘pressed’ together with a digital cylindrical effect. A personal response to Jim Rosenberg’s essay ‘THE INTERACTIVE DIAGRAM SENTENCE: HYPERTEXT AS A MEDIUM OF THOUGHT’ in which

The most basic elemental structural act, the most fundamental micromaneuver at the heart of all abstraction, is juxtaposition, ‘structural zero’: the act of simply putting an element on top of another, with no other structural relation between the two elements except that they are brought together.

with an unexpected, but welcome counter-response from the spirit of Piet Mondrian.

Problem: Is the use of a cylinder (or printing press) an “act of simply putting an element on top of another”, or does the use of the cylinder constitute a “structural relation between the two elements” which does more than simply bring them together? And what about the choice of orientation for each layer? Is that a structural relation that goes beyond the simple act of placement?

—Click on gallery to view full size—

6 responses

  1. “…does the use of the cylinder constitute a “structural relation between the two elements” which does more than simply bring them together? And what about the choice of orientation for each layer? Is that a structural relation that goes beyond the simple act of placement?”
    it seems an excellent perspective on print arts, on printing, the art of.
    printing takes so many forms in art.
    one thing, a choice is made if elements disparate or otherwise are to be brought together. though sometimes results might be:) a “happy accident”. so on this path you find the language of abstraction includes the action/movement (of hand or eye or brain) involved in making something, the decisions made (investigation, choices) in process, the actions following the initial stroke or decision as reinforced by the eye seeing it there for the first time and adding at least 50% of the wherewithall to make the next move. despite what ever may have happened before with any plan, outline or preliminary vision. haha
    i really like the imagery, it looks hieroglyphic -in fact, on the 1st one, you could zoom in and see characters -one i saw is like a little supermario leaning out of a window, simple cartoon-like line drawing nestled in the field – i love it when that happens, when the abstraction creates something recognizable by accident or by design or both:)

    • oops forgot to mention,it can be called “abstract narrative” if it contains a (random)cartoon or a figure or something that has some recognizable form, a “narrative” within the abstract

    • The ideogrammatic/hieroglyphic nature of these images is interesting in the context of Rosenberg’s practice. He looks for ways to juxtapose words while retaining the legibility of word syntax. The problem with stacking words on top of each other, for Rosenberg, is that they become unintelligible. One of his solutions is to make the stack interactive, so you can hover over it with a cursor and reveal specific layers. Another of his ideas, if I read it correctly, is to learn how to read natively in hypertext, so all the info in the links that you would normally follow away from the main text is contained in the native language of the main text…

      but what if words could be stacked in such a way that they create an ideogram which contains the meaning of each individual word, intelligible as individual components and, simultaneously, as a juxtaposition? Little supermario, since he contains two stacked components, could be read as two-thirds of an RGB colour, then the figure juxtaposed beside him would need to be consulted to discover what colour supermario is two-thirds of. And the supermario combination could carry its own meaning, like ‘to be hard-headed’ or ‘to line one’s pockets with coins’. Abstract narrative is fun! Thanks. Kathi:)

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